The 2022 FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup- How to watch, when, where, host, groups, schedule, tickets

by Christina S. Brown
0 comment

The 2022 FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup will be held in Sydney, Australia from September 22 to October 1st. The Women’s Basketball World Cup is the premier international basketball tournament for women’s national teams.

The 2022 FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup will be an important event for the sport of basketball and for the women’s game in particular. It will be a chance for the best players in the world to showcase their skills on the biggest stage, and for the sport to grow its global footprint.

As the host country for this year’s FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup, Australia will be looking to put on a show.

There are 11 other countries between Team USA and the top slot, each with a legitimate claim to the podium. Australia, Canada, Japan, China, South Korea, Mali, Serbia, France, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Belgium, and Puerto Rico are the countries involved.

Everything you need to know about the Women’s Basketball World Cup next event is right here.

When will the Women’s Basketball World Cup be held in 2022?

This year’s World Cup is a very short event, lasting from September 22 to October 1, 2022.

Group matches will continue until September 27, followed by the final phase on September 29.

Where will the Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022 take place?

Australia is the host country, and all games will be held in Sydney.

Matches will be hosted at both the Sydney SuperDome and the Sydney Olympic Park Sports Centre, with all finals taking place at the larger SuperDome.

How to Watch the Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022 in Australia:

ESPN will broadcast the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup in Australia.

ESPN is accessible on FuboTV, Foxtel, Fetch, and Kayo Sports in Australia.

Groups for the Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022:

The competition in 2022 is divided into two groups: Group A and Group B.
12 teams will compete in 38 games over two locations in Sydney, Australia, from September 22 to October 1, 2022.

The event’s draw took place on March 3rd, earlier this year, and divided

Each group features six nations, with the quarter-final pairings determined by a draw at the end of the group stage.

Belgium, China, Bosnia and Herzegovina, South Korea, the United States, and Puerto Rico comprise Group A.

Australia is in Group B, with France, Serbia, Japan, Mali, and Canada.

Over the course of six days, all teams in their respective groups will play each other once, with the top four teams advancing to the quarterfinals. The quarterfinal pairings will be determined by a random lottery.

The results of the quarter-finals will be followed by two semi-finals, with the final taking place the following day, October 1.

More News: WNBA Finals Game 4 How to watch Connecticut Sun vs Las Vegas Aces Live Stream, TV, Preview, standing and more

Schedule and fixtures for the Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022:

Australia’s group stage schedule is as follows:

Game Opponent Date Time (AEST) Venue
1 France Thu 22 Sept 8:30 p.m Sydney Superdome
2 Mali Fri 23 Sep 8:30 p.m Sydney Superdome
3 Serbia Sun 25 Sep 6:00 p.m Sydney Superdome
4 Canada Mon 26 Sep 8:30 p.m Sydney Superdome
5 Japan Tue 27 Sep 8:30 p.m Sydney Superdome

The full game schedule for the tournament can be found here.

Why are Russia and Nigerians not competing?

Following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine earlier in 2022, the country was eliminated from the competition and replaced by Puerto Rico in Group A.

They were withdrawn from Nigeria in June owing to government involvement. Mali has taken their place.

Previous Women’s Basketball World Cup Winner:

The Women’s Basketball World Cup has had 18 editions, with the United States, predictably, being the most successful nation.

Australia last won the World Cup in 2006 and finished second in 2018.

Year Champion Runner-up
1953 United States Chile
1957 United States Soviet Union
1959 Soviet Union Bulgaria
1964 Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
1967 Soviet Union South Korea
1971 Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
1975 Soviet Union Japan
1979 United States South Korea
1983 Soviet Union United States
1986 United States Soviet Union
1990 United States Yugoslavia
1994 Brazil China
1998 United States Russia
2002 United States Russia
2006 Australia Russia
2010 United States Czech Republic
2014 United States Spain
2018 United States Australia

Tickets for the Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022:

Fans interested in attending this year’s World Cup have several ticket options.

There are alternatives for everyone, from day passes during the group stage to luxury experiences for those seeking to splurge.

Tickets are currently on sale and can be purchased here.

Stars to Watch FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup 2022:

Breanna Stewart (USA)

Breanna Stewart (USA)

Team USA, the reigning world and Olympic champions, will arrive in Sydney as the favorites to win this year’s competition.

In addition to a strong background that includes 10 world titles and nine Olympic gold medals, they boast a squad that combines a healthy mix of depth, youth, and experience.

For those seeking for the ace in their deck, several players exhibit star qualities, but when it comes to international play, it is difficult to look past Breanna Stewart.

The Seattle Storm forward, a three-time USA Basketball Female Athlete of the Year, has a devastating record in a US jersey.

Since being called up to the national team in 2013, she has helped Team USA win gold in Rio 2016 and Tokyo 2020 (14-0), as well as at the 2014 and 2018 FIBA World Cups (12-0).

Stewart was named Most Valuable Player (MVP) in the 2018 Worlds in Tenerife, Spain, after starting all six games and averaging a team-leading 16.3 points per game, 6.3 rebounds, and 2.5 assists per game.

It was an award she would reclaim in 2021, following the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, where she continuously performed for her squad. Stewart had 14 points, 14 rebounds, five assists, and four steals in the championship game versus Japan, giving him a tournament double-double of 15 points and 10 rebounds per game.

Jones, Jonquel (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Jones, Jonquel (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Jonquel Jones, arguably the best women’s basketball player on the planet, and her remarkable climb to the top are almost certain to steal some of the focus in Sydney.

Currently playing for the Connecticut Sun in the 2022 WNBA Finals, Bahamian-born Jones has completely changed the fortunes of Bosnia and Herzegovina since receiving dual citizenship and joining the squad in 2019.

With Jones at the helm, the Eastern European nation has qualified for both EuroBasket and the World Cup for the first time in its history, producing some significant upsets along the road.

Jones scored 36 points and grabbed 23 rebounds in an 87-82 victory over Olympic silver medalists Japan in the World Cup qualification event earlier this year.

Though Bosnia and Herzegovina may be missing Jones at the start of the tournament if the best-of-five WNBA Finals require all five game days to conclude, they can be confident that when the 2021 WNBA MVP does arrive, she will be in top shape.

Jonquel Jones is an important player for Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as the Connecticut Sun.
Jonquel Jones is an important player for Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as the Connecticut Sun.

Jackson, Lauren (Australia)

Jackson, Lauren (Australia)

When the 2006 winners and runners-up in 2018, Australia will be seeking to gain an advantage as they welcome the world to their shores in September.

And if they were seeking for a sign that the time has come to dethrone Team USA, the return of Lauren Jackson to the roster is unquestionably one.

The 41-year-old WNBA Hall of Famer highlighted a stunning comeback to the game after being named to Australia’s fifth FIBA World Cup roster by head coach Sandy Brondello.

Jackson returns from retirement, hoping to add another chapter to his already illustrious career.

To date, the center has won two WNBA championships with the Seattle Storm in 2004 and 2010, as well as league titles in Australia, Spain, and Russia, as well as four WNBA MVP awards and three Olympic silver medals and one bronze.

After her playing career was endangered by knee issues, the Opal retired in 2016. She had two boys after retiring before making her comeback.

 

You may also like

Leave a Comment